Archive for February, 2020

WhatifWe127 — My Internet Interface

February 29, 2020

Hopefully, this post will answer many of the questions that I have received about the Internet services that I am receiving.

First, please understand that I do not have a team. There is one of me and I am home based.

My Internet service is provided by Earthlink.

Recently I changed from DSL to a cable Internet communication process due to a major regional outage.

My blog is provided by the free WordPress site which may or may not add some advertising.

I also have a @whatifwe2048 Twitter site.

I designed my Website using Microsoft Front Page.

I have successfully accessed my web-site and blog on a LINUX, WINDOWS, and MAC machine.

My Response to Large Quantity of Comments

February 28, 2020

I am the only one managing the blog and hence
have a limited amount of time to do so.

If there are less than 100 comments, I will examine
each comment to determine whether I will approve it
or delete it.

If there are more than 100 comments, I will examine
and approve comments according the following rules:

For each group of twenty comments, I will:
1. Find the first one that I can approve.
2. Approve the selected comment.
3. Delete the remaining 19 comments.

Thank You for your understanding.

ISO9001 BASED SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

February 25, 2020

To be strictly compliant with ISO9001, Programmers must use enforceable standard methods and processes.

Assembly Language Programmers used macros for common multi-instruction processes. These macros, once developed, were never changed.

Software “breaks fatally” when it illegally writes. The error cannot be fixed and it might take the machine down.

There are many error detection code segments that programmers use during checkout and then remove before delivery.

I developed a C++ Macro Preprocessor to provide a highly competent macro capability to facilitate using error detection code.

WHATIFWE used C++ Macro Preprocessor and its Macros to implement the Standards required by ISO9001?

 

Life of A Programmer — Session 6.3 — What should a Quality Assurance Software Engineer Know.

February 24, 2020

SOFTWARE ERROR SOURCE 2: THE OPERATING SYSTEM.

The operating system is the silent partner in all software
development activities.

The operating system, also having been developed by human
beings, will also have errors.

Most of the errors will have already been discovered.

The ones that have not been discovered will, in general,
be difficult to fix.

You, as the user, will have no control over that repair
process.

Consequently, you may end up with a difficult task of
working around a system error that was discovered on your
watch.

MORE IN THE NEXT MESSAGE

 

How I Protect My Proprietary Data

February 22, 2020

The original purpose of my blog was to provide me an easy
means of reporting my activity on my personally funded
research and development activities on error-free software
development methods.

My research and development activities produces a large
quantity of proprietary data. How do I protect this data?
Simple! I do not publish it on my blog or any other web-sites.

The purpose of “reporting my activity” involves establishing
the date at which a particular task was accomplished. The
task is sufficiently identified to enable me to identify
the associated proprietary data and daily log which is
stored on my machines, flash drives, and DVD’s.

Also, please let me remind you that when your machine is
not connected to the internet, hackers cannot access your
machine.

 

 

My Invitation To You

February 21, 2020

I became a software engineer in 1966 due to an experiment
that I had performed. I have never taken a course in
Software Engineering. Over the years, I have continued
to experiment on my own time and have greatly benefited
from this activity

In 1992, I became a home based software development business.
I developed a set of tools to aid me in my business activities.
These tools evolved over time and are now capable of helping
a software engineer to become a better, more competitive programmer.

I invite you to take a similar path. My tools can be downloaded
free-of-charge from my web-site, http://www.whatifwe.com and they are
well documented.

The Deming Cycle — Everyone Should Know It.

February 18, 2020

The Deming Cycle, the historical basis for all Quality
Assurance Programs, helped Japan to recover after World
War II.

The Deming Cycle consists of four steps: Plan, Do, Check
the Results, and Alter the Plan if necessary.

The Deming Cycle is a good definition of common sense.
I have used it on many occasions without knowing it.

When applying the Deming Cycle, when do we learn new and
better ways of doing our task?

We learn during the fourth step of the Deming Cycle when
we Alter our Plan.

WHATIFWE were all taught the Deming Cycle as a part of
our public education?

Life of A Programmer — Session 6.2 — What should a Quality Assurance Software Engineer Know.

February 17, 2020

SOFTWARE ERROR SOURCE 1: THE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER.

All Software Development Engineers are human beings, not little
green-guys from Mars

All human beings, including Software Development Engineers make
errors.

Software errors created by Junior Programmers are discovered early
and easily fixed.

Errors created by Senior Programmers take a long time to surface
and are usually hard to fix.

You have probably already had to solve a very difficult problem
on a project that you completed a year ago

MORE IN THE NEXT MESSAGE

PROGRESS REPORT – 2020-02-06

February 6, 2020

2020-02-02

Both the read and load Modifications of the typedef library have been successfully tested on the Windows machine. Next task is to prepare the parts file for export to the Linux and Apple Machine.

2020-02-03

Both the read and load Modifications of the typedef library have been successfully tested on the Apple and Linux machines. No corrections or modifications of the software parts was needed. Next task will be to test its error handling capabilities

 

The Computer Wisdom of Bugs Bunny

February 4, 2020

Do you remember the Bug’s Bunny cartoon where he pops out of the ground
in the middle of the desert and says “I think that I should have turned
left at Albuquerque”?

Mistakes always happen; some because of stupidity, some because of greed;
some because the required knowledge was not available, and some because
we are just human beings.

We are currently experiencing a great many security problems due to
hackers.

The basic computer design that makes this possible has a common program
and data buss. Hackers can cause their program to be loaded on the target
machine via this common buss.

In the late 1970’s, there was a different computer design, the Harvard
Architecture with separate data and program busses. This architecture
cannot be hacked.

About 1985, the microprocessor became practical and the Harvard
Architecture became obsolete.

“Did we turn right at Albuquerque in error”? I believe so. Could we
have avoided it? I think not. We could not have predict the future.

Should we re-vitalize the Harvard Architecture? I think the benefits
would greatly out-weigh the costs.